About the Book

How Bad Are Bananas?

How Bad Are Bananas?

The Carbon Footprint of Everything
April 2011
Trade Paperback · 256 Pages
$16.95 U.S.
ISBN 9781553658313
Greystone Books

 

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Description

Is it more environmentally friendly to ride the bus or drive a hybrid car? In a public washroom, should you dry your hands with paper towel or use the air dryer? And how bad is it really to eat bananas shipped from South America?

Climate change is upon us whether we like it or not. Managing our carbon usage has become a part of everyday life and we have no choice but to live in a carbon-careful world. The seriousness of the challenge is getting stronger, demanding that we have a proper understanding of the carbon implications of our everyday lifestyle decisions. However most of us don't have sufficient understanding of carbon emissions to be able to engage in this intelligently.

Part green-lifestyle guide, part popular science, How Bad Are Bananas? is the first book to provide the information we need to make carbon-savvy purchases and informed lifestyle choices, and to build carbon considerations into our everyday thinking. It also helps put our decisions into perspective with entries for the big things (the World Cup, volcanic eruptions, and the Iraq war) as well as the small (email, ironing a shirt, a glass of beer). And it covers the range from birth (the carbon footprint of having a child) to death (the carbon impact of cremation). Packed full of surprises-a plastic bag has the smallest footprint of any item listed, while a block of cheese is bad news-the book continuously informs, delights, and engages the reader.

Highly accessible and entertaining, solidly researched and referenced, packed full of easily digestible figures, catchy statistics, and informative charts and graphs, How Bad Are Bananas? is doesn't tell people what to do, but it will raise awareness, encourage discussion, and help people to make up their own minds based on their own priorities.

About the Author

Mike Berners-Lee is founding director of Small World Consulting, an associate company of Lancaster University (UK) specializing in organizational responses to climate change. His research, often in partnership with Lancaster University or the Crichton Carbon Centre, includes the development of leading footprint tools based on environmental input-output analysis, life cycle analysis, and hybrid methodologies.
His commercial client work is focused primarily on enabling realistic and credible understanding of greenhouse gas impacts for the purposes of practical decision making. Berners-Lee's clients include major supermarkets, architecture firms, and numerous small- and medium-sized businesses interested in reducing their carbon footprint, including farms, hotels, and breweries.
Prior to founding Small World, Mike worked for 15 years in training and development. He holds a degree in physics from Oxford University and an MSc (with distinction) in Organisation Development from Sheffield Hallam. Mike lectures occasionally at the universities of Lancaster and Cumbria.